A HISTORY OF THE VILLANOVA

CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS

FROM 1847 to 1962

Rev. Edward F. Jenkins, OSA

Fall, 1970

[We invite readers to add to this work, especially in continuing the history beyond 1962, when Fr Jenkins moved to the Astronomy Department. Please write to the Chemistry Department, Villanova University, Villanova PA, 19085.]

 

            In 1806 Mr. John Rudolph, a Catholic gentleman and merchant of Philadelphia, bought about 250 acres of land in Radnor Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania; about ten miles west of Philadelphia, on the Lancaster Turnpike and built a fine house for himself on the property, together with all the other necessary buildings, such as barns, stables, etc. He named the estate Belle Air, spelled this way, after his father's old home in Bel Air, Maryland which is spelled that way. He was a generous man who liked to entertain his friends, and he always offered the hospitality of his home to visiting priests who were invited to celebrate Mass in his large parlor, which was no doubt built large just for that purpose, as was customary in Maryland in colonial days. When a priest said Mass in the parlor of Belle Air the members of the Rudolph household, the farm employees and Catholic neighbors were invited in. In 1838 Mr. Rudolph died and three years later about 200 acres of the property (50 had been sold separately) were offered for sale.

 

            The Belle Air estate was advertised as being in Radnor Township, Delaware County, "about 10 miles west of the city, on the Lancaster Turnpike and the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad". It was described as consisting of about 200 acres of "first rate Land, about 40 acres of which are wood of superior quality of oak and hickory. The improvements are a two-story stone Mansion 46 feet front by 36 feet 6 inches deep, and two-story stone kitchen (back) 38 feet by 21 feet 6 inches, with piazzas, - 5 rooms on the first floor, with a spacious hall, 7 rooms on the second floor, and 3 large garrets; a large stone Barn, 69 feet by 46 feet, with stabling for 40 head of cattle and 15 horses, with spacious garners, a stone Coach House, with stabling for 6 horses; a small Farm House, and stone Barn sufficient to stable 20 head of cattle; a stone Spring House and spring of excellent water; a large stone Smoke House and Poultry House, under which is a commodious Hog House, also a double corn crib. The farm is divided into fields of convenient size enclosed with good fencing. There is a fine apple orchard of choice fruit. Both of the above-mentioned roads pass through the premises. The above farm will be sold together or in parts to suit the purchasers".

 

            On October 13, 1841 the entire farm was bought by the Rev. Thomas Kyle,  OSA, of St. Augustine’s Church, Philadelphia, and the Rev. Dr. Patrick Moriarity,  OSA, the superior of the American Province, in the name of the "Brothers of the Order of Hermits of St. Augustine" for $18.000. Shortly afterwards Mrs. Rudolph sold them the house furniture and farming utensils for $3,400. Within five years all but $2,000 had been paid.

 

            At first Villanova was an academy for young boys, plus a college in which courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Sciences could be taken, as well as advanced courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts. The first classes were held on September 17, 1843. Most of the boys must have been quite young because it was not until the spring of 1848 that the Fathers petitioned the state legislature for a charter to grant degrees. On March 10 of that year the Governor, Francis R. Shunk, signed "An Act to incorporate the Augustinian College of Villanova in the County of Delaware, in the State of Pennsylvania", granting it very wide powers to give "all the degrees usually given by colleges and universities, with the usual diplomas and certificates". The seven gentlemen designated as incorporators held their first formal meeting on May 1, 1848, at which they elected officers of their board of trustees, and at the same time chose the officers and instructors of the college for the coming year. The Rev. John P. O'Dwyer, OSA, a very capable young man of 29, was elected President, while Brother Ambrose A. Mullen, OSA, was chosen Professor of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry. The other names can be found on page 31 of Father Middleton's Historical Sketch of Villanova, published in 1893 on the occasion of the Golden Jubilee of the college.

 

            Brother Ambrose Mullen was born, either in Brooklyn, New York or on a ship at sea between Ireland and Brooklyn on April 12, 1827. He and his brother Edward and another young man, Patrick Stanton, were sent to Rome by the Augustinian superior in America in 1842 to study for the priesthood. In 1847 on account of troubled political conditions in Italy they arrived back at St. Augustine's in Philadelphia and were sent to Villanova to complete their theological training. At this time and for at least 50 years afterward professed clerics of the Order were called Brothers. Ambrose Mullen was most likely our first chemistry teacher. He was 21 years old when he was appointed to the Villanova faculty and was 23 in 1850 when he was ordained to the priesthood in Philadelphia by Bishop Gartland of Savannah, Georgia. He was still the Professor of Chemistry in 1857 when the college was temporarily closed. In the meantime, however, Villanova had granted its first two bachelor's' degrees in 1855.

 

            The fathers decided to close the college for a while in 1857 because they felt they could not properly operate it and at the same time take care of their missions in Philadelphia, Chestnut Hill, Atlantic City, Saint Denis and Villanova: they were only 10 in number. They intended to open it as soon as they could get enough priests but in the meantime the Civil War came along, which caused the reopening to be postponed until the fall of 1865. The new course of studies was practically the same as of old; Father Ambrose Mullen was appointed Prior of the Monastery and President of the College. (The Monastery then consisted of the old Rudolph mansion.) Father Mullen probably continued to teach chemistry; at least nobody else is mentioned as having been appointed to that position. In 1869 he was transferred to Andover, Massachusetts, being succeeded at Villanova by Father Patrick Stanton, OSA, under whose leadership the college made great progress. It is not stated who taught chemistry for the next two years; perhaps it was Father Stanton, but we do know that in 1871 Charles Stockton Gauntt, M. D., joined the Villanova faculty as Professor of Chemistry and Physics, a position he held for 21 years.

 

            Father Ambrose Mullen, our first chemistry professor, did not live long; he died in Andover, Massachusetts on July 7, 1876, at the age of 49. Father O'Dwyer, our first President, also died young, Father Middleton says probably from overwork, in 1850 at the age of 36.

 

            The first Villanova College Catalogue - they were always spelled that way - was issued in the summer of 1871 when Father Patrick Stanton, OSA, was President. It was called the Catalogue for 1870 - 1871. This year, 1970 - 1971, is the 100th year since the first catalogue was issued, and during the past century there have been only two years during which catalogues were not published: the years 1943-1944 and 1946-1947. These two catalogues are missing from the Falvey Library collection, and I do not think they were ever published. For the other 98 years of the past century, 95 annual Catalogues and three "Supplementary" Catalogues have been published, which are all in the Falvey Library collection. The "Supplementary" Catalogues, short lists of courses, prices and dates to take the place of unpublished catalogues, were issued for the years 1947-1948, 1950-1951 and 1951-1952. The "Supplementary" Catalogues give no faculty lists. There is no Catalogue dated 1905-1906, but it was not omitted. It was published in the summer of 1906, as usual, but was called the Catalogue for 1906-1907. Since then all the catalogues have been dated for the year following their publication, but usually list the faculty for the year previous to their publication, who frequently were not there the following year.

 

            Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy, formerly called Natural Philosophy, were always taught as part of the liberal arts course at Villanova. Father Middleton's Golden Jubilee Book of 1892, and the College Catalogues show that chemistry was always taught, together with laboratory work and demonstrations. The Golden Jubilee Catalogue of 1892-1893, tells us that Dr. Gauntt was still Professor of Chemistry. In the following pages I will describe the progress of Chemistry at Villanova during the next 70 years.

 

            Charles Stockton Gauntt, M. D., joined the Villanova College faculty in 1871 as Professor of Chemistry and Physics. He was with us until June 1893. According to the catalogs of 1891 and 1892, he was using Porter as a text. This must have been John Addison Porter's Principles of Chemistry, whose 20th edition, improved, was published in 1868! This is the last time this book was revised, and a copy of this 20th edition is in the Villanova Library (the Falvey Library). It is very archaic, with no mention of the Periodic Table. I think Dr. Gauntt must have been using the same book for twenty-one years!

 

1894 - 1895

            Brother Coar is again the Professor of Latin, Chemistry, Physics and Physiology. They seem to have found somebody else to teach English Grammar. Father Laurence Augustine Delurey, D. D., OSA, became President of the College this year, a position he held unti11910. Villanova grew and improved both physically and scholastically under his leadership. He and Father Fedigan, the Provincial both felt that Villanova should become a much larger college than it was. It was under their leadership that a much larger building was started in 1899. In 1904 Father Delurey started our Engineering School. The first students in Civil and Electrical Engineering were accepted that year and the first class graduated in 1908.

 

1895 - 1896

            Father Waiter A. Coar, OSA, is again Professor of Latin, Chemistry, Physics and Physiology. On May 27, 1895 he had been ordained priest in the Cathedral, Philadelphia, by Archbishop Ryan. As of last year, the Juniors alone took chemistry, and used "Steele". I don't see how this could be anything but Fourteen Weeks in Chemistry, by Joel Dorman Steele (1836-1886), the revised edition of 1873. They seem to have had a penchant for using old books.

 

1896 - 1897

            Father Coar, besides being Professor of Logic, Chemistry, Physics and Physiology, is now also Vice President, Prefect of Studies and Prefect of Discipline. I am glad to see they have given him a helper, Joseph F. X. Harold, Ph.D., who is named as the Assistant Professor of Chemistry. The curriculum is the same as last year.

 

1897 - 1898

            Father Coar is Professor of Chemistry again, and he also has all the other jobs. He also seems to have lost his assistant. The courses and the curriculum are the same as last year: the Juniors take chemistry and use "Steele". The Catalog says "Lectures and Laboratory work by Professor and students".

 

1898 - 1899

            The year opened in September 1898 with Mr. Thomas D. J. Gallagher, A. B., as Professor of Chemistry and Physics. Both the Sophomores and Juniors seem to have studied Chemistry this year, under the direction of Mr. Gallagher. It is the only year he appears on the Villanova faculty. This year Father Walter Coar, OSA, met a tragic death. While crossing the tracks at the Pennsylvania Railroad station at Villanova on the night of January 25, 1899, he was run over by a train. His body, cut in two, was found on the tracks about ten-thirty P.M. The late Father John Barthousky, who was a young college student at the time, never forgot this dreadful night and told me about it fifty years later. He said Father Coar had returned, alone, from the city a few minutes earlier and, it was believed, fell while crossing the tracks and lay unconscious in the dark until a train ran over him. He was only 31 years old. He was a talented man and a capable and willing worker. His death was a great loss to Villanova. He was the last person to be buried in the old community cemetery which was northwest of the Chapel, where part of the Monastery now is. On March 27, 1899, ground was broken for the new monastery (burned down in 1932), Mass was offered for the deceased brethren and their remains were all removed to the new cemetery to the east of the chapel.

 

OBITUARY. It is our sad duty to chronicle the death of Rev. Walter A. Coar, a beloved member of our community at Villanova. In the prime of life, he was snatched away from us leaving a void that no other personality can fill. His death was peculiarly sad, owing to its tragic character. While crossing the tracks at Villanova he was struck by a train and so severely injured that death ensued a few moments later. The funeral took place at Villanova on Saturday the 28th, in the presence of a large concourse of people. The clergy, both secular and religious, attended in a body and chanted the Office of the Dead with great solemnity, presided over by Bishop Prendergast. A Solemn High Mass of Requiem was sung by Father J. B. Leonard, OSA assisted by the Rev. T. J. Sullivan as deacon and the Rev. J. F. Sweeny as sub-deacon. The two later were ordained with Father Coar. Rev. J. F. Medina, OSA, directed the choir and presided at the organ. The Benedictus was touchingly rendered by the Rev. Joseph O'Keefe of the Cathedral. The absolution of the body, was given by Archbishop Ryan and a funeral oration delivered by Father, J. J. O'Brien, OSA after which the remains were consigned to the little monastic cemetery in the rear of the church. May God, whose ways are inscrutable, yet always for the best, grant him everlasting rest and teach us to be ever in readiness for the dread summons which "cometh as a thief in the night". Our Lady of Good Counsel Magazine, February 1899, p. 486 There was also an Ode from the "Student's Tribune”, in Memory, of Father Coar.

 

 

 

1899 - 1900

            In this final year of the Nineteenth Century, Mr. James A. McDonald, O. S.A., taught chemistry at Villanova, and the Sophomores and Juniors studied it. According to the catalogs, James A. McDonald taught chemistry at Villanova for four years: two years before his ordination and two years after. He was twenty-two years old when he began teaching chemistry in 1899, and twenty- four when he was ordained in 1901. Father McDonald passed most of his life in parish work, was a Chaplain in the First World War, and died at the age of 64 on January 13, 1941.

 

1900 - 1901

            Mr. James A. McDonald, O.S.A., was Professor of Chemistry and the following courses were taught: For the Sophomores - Inorganic Chemistry, lectures and laboratory work. For the Juniors - Qualitative Analysis, lectures and laboratory work. The Freshmen and Seniors had no chemistry. The Seniors, however, all studied philosophy, and once a week they had an “Academy", i.e., a formal scholastic disputation. The Catalog does not say whether it was in English or Latin.

 

1901 - 1902

            Father McDonald is again Professor of Chemistry and, the Catalog says, Herr Jan Koert is Professor of Violin. Mr. John M. Reiner makes his first appearance on the faculty this year. He was a very influential man: Father Delurey had a high opinion of him and sought his advice on many things. The same chemistry courses are offered as last year. In this year's catalog the Belle Air Dormitory is advertised, with a picture and a caption which says "Fifty comfortable rooms for students, two large parlors, two billiard rooms and every modern comfort for the use of the students”. The picture shows it was the much-enlarged Rudolph Mansion, long used as a monastery and later, under the name of St. Rita's Hall, as a House of Postulants. It burned down in 1912, and was replaced by the present St. Rita's Hall, on the same site. The Belle Air Dormitory reminds us that the new Monastery, which burned down in 1932, had been finished and the Fathers were living in it. This is also the first year the new college building was used. It was approaching completion during the summer of 1901 and in September the dormitories, class-rooms and dining room were used by the returning students. This building, which was later called College Hall, burned down late in January, 1928, and was restored as Mendel Hall. Since 1961 it has been called Tolentine Hall. It is also announced in this catalog that the student can get the degree of Bachelor of Science instead of Bachelor of Arts by substituting sciences instead of Latin and/or Greek.

 

1902 - 1903

            Father McDonald is still the Professor of Chemistry, Physiology and Latin, and the same chemistry courses are being taught. 1903 - 1904 Michael Caboni, a Doctor of Science of the Royal University of Rome, is now Professor of Chemistry, Physics, Physiology, Zoology and Botany. The same chemistry courses are offered for Sophomores and Juniors, plus an elective course in Inorganic and Organic analysis for Seniors. Dr. Caboni must have had quite a schedule. We read in this catalog: The Villanova campus is the delight of the students and the admiration of all visitors.

 

 

 

1904-1905

Rev. Laurence A. Delurey, D. D., OSA, President and Prefect of Studies, Professor of Elocution and Oratory.

Caboni, Michael. D. S. (Royal University of Rome), Professor of Chemistry, Physics, Physiology, Geology and Botany.

Reiner, John M. Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Civics. History and History of Philosophy.

Tadd. J. Liberty, Miss Alice S. Hunter and Mr. B. Uble, Professors of Drawing, Carving and Clay Modeling.

 

            This catalog announces for the first time courses in Civil and Electrical Engineering. All four years of Civil Engineering are to be offered immediately, along with the first two of Electrical Engineering, the last two of Electrical Engineering will be offered as needed. A very extensive list of chemistry courses is offered for the first time: 1. Inorganic Chemistry (lectures) 2. Experimental Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis 3. Organic Chemistry 4. Quantitative Analysis 5. Organic Experimental Chemistry and Organic Qualitative Analysis . Hollman's Laboratory Manual and Noyes and Mulliken's Class Reactions and Identifications of Organic Compounds used as texts. 6. Metallurgy, principally for engineers, no laboratory work but plant trips. 7. Quantitative Analysis for Engineers

 

Optional Courses for Seniors: 1. Industrial Chemistry 2. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 3. Advanced Organic Chemistry - laboratory work: analyses and preparations 4. Special Methods in Quantitative Analysis 5. Physical Chemistry 6. Technical Inorganic Analysis 7. Technical Organic Analysis.

 

1905-1906

            The catalog for this year is missing (not really). Since I wrote the last line, several months ago, I have discovered that the 1905-1906, Catalog is not really missing. It only seems to be, because they skipped the year number, 1905-1906, and called it the calendar for 1906-1907, which it really was, since it was published after the 1906 commencement, and was intended, as at present, to advertise the coming year, i.e., the ensuing year, On account of this though, the future catalogs are usually the catalogs of the year before. Being made up in the spring of the year, they often list teachers who will not be present, and neglect to list some who are present.

 

1906 - 1907

            No professor of chemistry is named in this year’s catalog but the same courses are listed as in 1904-05, and since in 1906 the Engineering Course was beginning its third year, somebody must have been teaching chemistry. It might have been Dr. Caboni. The 1906-1907 catalog does say that Bradbury was being used as the text in General Chemistry. This must have been Elementary Chemistry by Robert Hart Bradbury, Appleton, 1903, Text and Laboratory Manual. This year’s catalog also says that 1% of a student's grade will be deducted for each unexcused absence, and that after ten unexcused absences he will be dropped from the course.

 

1907-08. 1908-09, 1909-10

            The catalogs for these three years list the same extensive chemistry courses as for the year 1904-05, and list Mr. John Frederick Gross Hicks, B. S., M.A., as the teacher. A biographical sketch of Dr. Hicks can be found in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th editions of American Men of Science. He was, I think, with the possible exception of Dr. Caboni, the first professionally-trained chemist to be employed as a teacher by Villanova College. This is typical of the way in which Fr. Delurey did things. Born in Philadelphia in 1884, Mr. Hicks graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1906 with the degree of B. S. in Chemistry. (He probably received the M. A. degree from Villanova in 1907). During the year 1906-07 he was Instructor in Chemistry at the Medico-Chiurgical College of Philadelphia. He says in his biography (in A. M. S.) that from 1907 to 1910 he taught chemistry at Villanova College as Instructor, Assistant Professor and Professor, respectively. Mr. Hicks left us in 1910 to accept a position with the Barrett Chemical Company of Philadelphia. After a few years he left them to continue his education at the University of Illinois, where he obtained the Master’s degree in 1916, and the Doctorate in 1918. In 1927 he was a college professor and research chemist, and was living in Seattle, Washington.

 

            One of the members of Dr. Hicks' chemistry class in 1909 or 1910, John F. Sweeney, CE(1912), Assistant and Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at Villanova from 1913 to 1930, mentions Dr. Hicks in a memoir of his college days he wrote many years later: In the fall of 1907 there was added to the faculty Professor J. F. G. Hicks, A. M., B.S., in charge of chemistry…. Professor Hicks will be remembered as the man who always enjoyed a good joke - on someone else. But now and then an alert student turned the joke on him. It was his custom just before closing up for the night to fill his pipe and place it beside his hat, all ready to catch the 5 o'clock train. One of the future chemists learned that KClO3 and Flowers of Sulfur would explode under certain conditions, so a dose of such mixture was carefully concealed in his pipe charge. The outcome was left to our imagination, for we never heard of it again".

 

            Professor Sweeney later goes on to say: In 1911 upon the resignation of Professor Hicks, the Chemistry Department was under the direction of Professor Williams (Boston U.) He remained but one year, after which time he was succeeded by Professor John F. Mockaitis, (Villanova and Medico Chi.) who remained until 1916. From 1916 to date he has been employed by the Standard Oil Company, as a research chemist.

 

            Dr. Hicks seems to have died before 1933. About this time his son, Dr. John Frederick Gross Hicks, Jr., appears in American Men of Science and, I believe, is still in it. Dr. Hicks, Jr., was born in Philadelphia while his father was teaching chemistry at Villanova. His specialty is ceramics. Professor Sweeney's autobiographical memoir of his student days at Villanova in the time of Father Delurey is very interesting and also important as the only composition of its kind I have ever come across. He describes in detail the foundation of the Engineering School, its: first faculty, its early laboratories and the life of a resident college student during the first decade of the twentieth century. The references are: The Engineering School - A Retrospection: Musings of an Old Grad - Laboratories and Class Rooms, The Owl, Vol. II, No.5, 6 and 7 (1927) Ibid. Vol. V, No.3 and 4 (1930)

 

            A revision: From the 1910 catalog: Juniors and Seniors are required to wear their caps and gowns at all times when in class or when walking around the grounds. Lay professors are also obliged by this rule, and should also, on solemn occasions, wear the hood characteristic of their degree, if they have any.

 

 

 

 

1910 - 1911

            Mr. Hicks is listed in the 1910-1911 catalog as Professor of Chemistry, but I think the catalog must have been printed in advance. In his biography in American Men of Science, written years later, he says he taught at Villanova College from 1907 to 1910 and then spent the next year at Barrett’s, in Philadelphia. I don't know who taught chemistry at Villanova this year. Maybe Mr. Hicks did teach it, part-time, or maybe Mr. Williams taught it. (See next year). According to the catalog, the same courses were offered as last year. In the Commencement exercise of June 14, 1911, Mr. Victor Herbert of New York is listed as the recipient of the honorary degree of Doctor of Music. I heard that he was so pleased that he offered to write the music of an alma mater song for us, gratis, if someone would write some suitable lyrics. But nobody ever wrote the necessary lyrics, and we lost our chance to get an alma mater song by Victor Herbert.

 

1911 - 1912

            This year the same chemistry courses are listed again, with Mr. H. Earnest Williams, A. B. (Boston University) as the professor.

 

1912-1913

            This year the same extensive list of chemistry courses are again offered, with Mr. John S. Mockaitis, B. S., Ph. G., as instructor. Ph. G. stands for Graduate Pharmacist. The 1912 Commencement Program shows that Mr. Mockaitis was in that year given the degree of B. S. in Chemistry by Villanova College. He was, however, never a Villanova College student, at least not a full-time undergraduate, and I don't think they had any other kind then. A list of all full-time undergraduates was printed in every catalog, and his name does not appear in any of them. Mr. William A. Slavin, for many years professor of Electrical Engineering at Villanova, graduated from our engineering school in 1913 and knew John Mockaitis well. Mr. Slavin told me, in 1950, that Mockaitis was given the degree of B. S. in Chemistry by Villanova on the strength of work done at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy (or Medico-Chi?) and at the University of Pennsylvania. He taught chemistry at Villanova from 1912 to 1916, and then left us to go into chemical industry. He was employed by the Standard Oil Company in their laboratory at Bayonne, New Jersey. He died in 1959.

 

1913 - 1914

            The same extensive list of chemistry courses is offered again, with John ' Mockaitis as Professor. About this time Fr. Edward Doban, OSA, President of the College, instituted the practice of sending some of our seminarians to neighboring universities to be trained in subjects they could teach at Villanova. One of the first seminarians to be educated under this system was Mr. Ruellan P. Fink, OSA, who was sent to the University of Pennsylvania to study chemistry during the summer of 1913. This was the summer after his freshman year in college, during which he had taken a chemistry course under Mr. Mockaitis. Mr. John O'Leary also studied chemistry at Villanova and at the University of Pennsylvania, but I don't know how much.

 

1914 - 1915

            Mr. John Mockaitis, B. S., is listed as Professor of Chemistry and Physics. In the Engineering School (the School of Technology) he taught only chemistry. Again the 1904-1905 chemistry courses are offered.

 

1915 - 1916

            Mr. John Mockaitis is again listed as Professor of Chemistry and Physics, and the 1904-1905 chemistry courses are, offered.

 

1916 - 1917

Dennehy, Mr. Cornelius J., Sc. B. –17- Sc. B., University of Dublin, Ireland

Fink, Mr. Ruellan P. J OSA, AB -16- A. B., Villanova, 1916

O'Leary. Mr. John S., OSA, A. B. –16- A. B. Villanova, 1916

[Here Father starts using the notation –yy- to indicate the year someone first joins the faculty.]

 

            The above men are the chemistry faculty for this year. Mr. Dennehy came some time after the year had started. The 1916-1917 Catalogue, which was probably printed in the spring of 1916 names John Mockaitis as Professor of Chemistry, but The Villanovan for November 1916 (Vol. 1. #l), says he left last June to take an important position in the Laboratory of the Standard Oil Company at Bayonne, NJ. The same article goes on to say that he has been succeeded by two young men of the class of 1916 who are well qualified to succeed him because they have both taken extensive courses in chemistry. The Villanovan will be very helpful from now on in tracing the development of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Villanova. In the issue of April 1917 we read that Mr. Cornelius J. Dennehy. B. Sc., College of Science, University of Dublin, has been added to the faculty as an instructor in the Department of Chemistry to assist Mr. Fink in the work of his department. The 1916-1917 Catalogue does not tell us how the various courses were divided among the three instructors. I may be overly sentimental, but it is touching to notice how the Villanovan Staff at this time always tried to help the College by making things look good for us even, or especially, when they weren't. Their old teacher had accepted "an important position", and was succeeded by two young men who were "well qualified to succeed him because they have both taken extensive courses in chemistry". We have certainly changed. Their old teacher had left because we could not afford to give him a raise. We had gone through a financial crisis a few years before and had still not recovered from it. What he wanted was reasonable enough but we could not afford to pay it. If it had not been for the two young Augustinian clerics we would have been in trouble. The Messrs. Fink and O'Leary had just graduated from college and were still three years from ordination. They were well trained in chemistry, at least Ruellan Fink was, and they did a good job of teaching their classes. It was hard to take over the chemistry department and study theology at the same time but they did it. This is especially true when one considers the large wartime classes and the great variety of courses they gave.

 

1917 - 1918

Dennehy. Mr. Cornelius J., Sc. B. -17- Professor of General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis

Fink, Mr. Ruellan P., OSA, A.B. -16- Professor of Physiological Chemistry and Assaying

O'Leary, Mr. John S., OSA, A. B. -16- Professor of Organic Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis

 

            In addition, the School of Technology announces that Mr. Dennehy will teach General Chemistry, Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis to the Mechanical Engineers while Mr. Fink teaches them Gas Analysis, Assaying and Blow Pipe Analysis. All I can say is that they must have been as busy as bees. The Villanovan for November, 1917, tells us that during the summer of 1917 Fr. Edward Dohan resigned as President on account of ill health and has been succeeded by Rev. James J. Dean, M. S., S.T.B., OSA, "who for many years has been Prefect of Studies and Dean of the Engineering School". In the 1917-1918 Catalog the Department of Biology is introduced for the first time, under the direction of Dr. Edward A. Mallon, M. D., of the Class of 1898, for many years the College Physician, assisted by Mr. Michael Hopkins, OSA, and Mr. Sylvester Martin, OSA, who had been studying at the University of Pennsylvania. It was also announced that the Department of Biology would offer a two-year Pre-Medical course. This is all that was required to get into Medical School in those days. It was later expanded into a four-year course. On April 6, 1917 the United States declared war on Germany. During the next few months selective service was adopted, registration and the first draft took place and many young men enlisted. Villanova would have been practically deserted in the fall of 1917 if the War Department had not sent us a group of several hundred young men for officer training. Consequently, instead of being deserted we had more students than ever before. This unit was called The Students' Army Training Corps, the SATC. We had the SATC unit from about September 1917 until December 1918, when it was disbanded. Most of these men took chemistry. On page 3 of my section on the Chemistry laboratories I have described how the Messrs. Fink and O'Leary handled their large classes.

 

1918 - 1919

Fink, Mr. Ruellan P.,  OSA, A. B. -16- Professor of Organic Chemistry, Advanced Organic Chemistry, Physiological Chemistry, Gas Analysis, Assaying, Geology and Mineralogy

O'Leary, Mr. John S.,  OSA, A. B. -16- Professor of General Chemistry, Qualitative and Quantitative Inorganic Analysis, and Quantitative Organic Analysis.

 

            Quite an ambitious schedule for two young men who were also studying theology. They taught all those courses, too. Mr. Dennehy is not mentioned this year. He must have departed. The Villanova College S. A. T. C. Unit was· disbanded on December 11, 1918. Most of the trainees, who had not been regular college students but men sent here by the Army to be trained, left Villanova after the unit was disbanded. This was the year of the great Influenza epidemic, one of the three greatest pestilences of recorded history, the other two being the Black Death of 1350 and the Great Plague of 1666. It completely disrupted classes during the month of October, 1918. Unless you lived through it, it is hard to imagine how bad it was. The Villanovan for November, 1918 says: "We got off better than most colleges in the Flu Epidemic: 173 cases and 5 deaths". This was, indeed, a small number of deaths for 173 cases, but considering the size of the college in 1918 it must have meant that nearly everybody had it. It was as though we would now have 4000 cases and 100 deaths within one month. Edward Jenkins, a twelve-year old boy of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, had the Flu in October, 1918, and he thinks it must have been very much like the Black Death, because he remembers his body covered with dark blue spots that were close together and must have looked quite alarming. They had a big INFLUENZA sign on the front door, and very few visitors.

 

1919 - 1920

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., OSA, M. A. -16- Professor of Chemistry; Metallurgy and Mineralogy, M. A.; Villanova College, 1919

O'Leary, Rev. John S., OSA; M. A. -16- Professor of Chemistry M. A., Villanova College; 1919 Fitzgerald; Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department A. B., Royal University, Dublin, Ireland, 1893, B. S. 1913 Ph. D., University of Wurtzburg, Germany, 1913 M. S., National University, Ireland, 1915

 

            Fathers Fink and O'Leary had been ordained to the priesthood in June 1919 and had also been awarded M.A. degrees by Villanova at the same time. In the 1919-1920 catalog we find the first announcement that two new courses, leading to the degrees of B. S. in Chemical Engineering and B.S. in Chemistry would be offered in the Fall of 1919 by the School of Technology. These new courses were organized by and under the direction of Father Robert Fitzgerald, OSA. In the February, 1919; issue of The Villanovan the following announcement of the new courses appears: With the opening of school after the demobilization of the SATC a new course was added to the courses in the School of Technology, that of Chemical Engineering, thus considerably enlarging the facilities which the college offers for the study of engineering, and meeting the special demands for a course of this kind, which the great development in chemistry that has been so noticeable in this country during the past four years has made necessary. The College is to be congratulated in having secured for the Department of Chemistry the services of the Rev. Robert J. Fitzgerald, OSA; M.Sc., Ph. D. Dr. Fitzgerald studied chemistry for a number of years at the University of Wurtzburg, in Germany; where he secured his doctorate in Philosophy in 1913, majoring in Chemistry, Physics and Botany. In 1915 Dr. Fitzgerald received the degree of Master of Science from the Royal University of Ireland for special research work in photoelectricity. Dr. Fitzgerald will conduct the classes in Organic Chemistry, and as soon as conditions warrant, will introduce a special class in the Chemistry of Dyes".

 

1920 - 1921

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., O.S.A., M.A. -16- Professor of Chemistry, Metallurgy and Mineralogy

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and

Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

O'Leary, Rev. John S., OSA, M. A. -16- Professor of Chemistry*

            *Father Grelis says (1968) that Father O'Leary hated chemistry and got out of it as soon as possible.

 

1921 - 1922

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P, OSA, M.A. -16- Dean of the Pre-Medical School,

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Metallurgy

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and

Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Martel, Rev. Alphonse, OSA, Ch. E. -21- Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry

 

            Father Howard Grelis, who knew him well, said Father Martel was a popular teacher, very volatile. In the summer of 1922 he was transferred to our school in San Diego, California. Several years later he left our Order to become a priest of the Diocese of Lafayette, Louisiana. He became a Pastor and a Right Reverend Monsignor in charge of building operations. He died in retirement at Quebec, P. Q., Canada, on November 7. 1959.

 

1922 - 1923

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., OSA, M. S. -16- Dean of the Pre-Medical School, Professor of Mineralogy, Metallurgy and Geology and Organic Chemistry , M. S., Villanova College, 1922

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph.D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Burke, Edward A. - Student Assistant. Taught the Preparatory Chemistry course. Helped Father Fitzgerald with the college courses. (Personal communication, 1968)

 

1923 - 1924

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., OSA, M. S. -16- Professor of Mineralogy, Metallurgy, Geology and Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Huntsinger, Herbert A., B. S., -23- Instructor in Chemistry

Blodgett, Williard A., B. S. -23- Instructor in Chemistry University of New Hampshire

Burke, Edward A., B. S. -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant B. S., Villanova College, 1923

Kenny, Alfred D. J B. S. -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant B. S. Villanova College, 1923

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

 

1924 - 1925

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., O. S.A., M. S. -16- Professor of Mineralogy, Metallurgy, Geology and Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Blodgett, Willard A., B. S. -23-Instructor in Chemistry

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

 

1925 - 1926

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., OSA, M. S. -16- Professor of Mineralogy, Metallurgy, Geology and Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of, the Department

Blodgett, Willard A., B. S. -23- Instructor in Chemistry

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

 

1926 - 1927

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., OSA, M. S. -16- Professor of Mineralogy, Metallurgy, Geology and Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Associate Professor of Chemistry B. S., Purdue University

M. S., University of Nebraska

Grelis, Edwin, A.B., -26- Instructor in Chemistry A. B., Villanova College

Venuto, Joseph A., B. S. -26- Instructor in Chemistry, B. S., University of Pennsylvania

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

 

            In this year's catalog we read: "The School of Technology offers courses in Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical and Sanitary Engineering and a course in General Chemistry”, (p. 54). A similar statement is also in the 1925-1926 and 1924-1925 catalogs.

 

 

1927 - 1928

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., O.S.A., M.S. -16- Prefect of Discipline Professor of Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Venuto, Joseph A., B. S. -26- Instructor in Chemistry

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

 

1928 - 1929

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P.,  OSA, M. S. -16- Prefect of Discipline Professor of Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

O'Leary, Rev. John S., O.S.A., M.S. -17- Professor of Mathematics and Chemistry. The 1929 Belle Air says he taught chemistry that year in St. Mary's Hall.

Venuto, Joseph A., B. S. -26- Instructor in Chemistry

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

Ford, John J., B. S. -28- Instructor in Chemistry B. S., Villanova, 1924

 

            The Belle Air says he taught chemistry in “The Sisters' School" which means Summer School or the Saturday Extension School. The 1929 Belle Air also says that Miss Helen Heffernan has been appointed Registrar - a position she held with distinction for five years.

 

1929 - 1930

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P.,  OSA, M. S. -16- Prefect of Discipline Professor of Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Venuto, Joseph A., B. S., M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry M. S., Villanova College; 1929

Kunzenbacher, August A., -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

 

1930 - 1931

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry

Grezenski, John I., B.S.-30- Associate Professor of Chemistry B.S.., Villanova College, 1927

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P.,  OSA, M. S. -16- Vice President, Prefect of Discipline, Professor of Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Kunzenbacher, August A. -23- Chemistry Laboratory Assistant

Venuto, Joseph A., M.8. -26- Professor of Chemistry

 

1931 - 1932

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry.

Fink, Rev. Ruellan P., OSA, -16- Vice-President, Prefect of Discipline Professor of Organic Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

 * Grezenski, John I., A. M. -30- Associate Professor of Chemistry A. M., Villanova College, 1931

Kunzenbacher, August A., A. B. -23- Instructor in Chemistry A. B., Villanova, College, 1931

Venuto, Joseph A., M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry

Wierman, Rev. Harry A.,  OSA ,A. M. -31- Associate Professor of Chemistry A. B., Villanova College, 1927; A. M. 193].

 

            * Ignatius Reginald John Gryczenski was born in Poland and brought to America as a child. Home: Jersey City, N. J. Education: Don Bosco H. S., Ramsay. N. J. 1922 and Villanova College, B. S. in Biol. 1927 and M. A. 1931. Instructor in Chem., Villanova 1929-1931.Changed name twice: 1st, about 1928, to John I. Grezenski, and 2nd, 6/15/1931, in Philadelphia, to Reginald John Grayson. M. D., Creighton U., Omaha. Neb., 1935; Medical Staff of Eastern Penitentiary, Philadelphia, until 1950. Now (1968) retired and living in Florida.

            Father Fink left us this year to become Principal of St. Rita's High School in Chicago, Illinois, where he is still living (February 1968). Father Fink is now (August 1970) the Prior of our school at Holland, Michigan, across the lake from Chicago. This is a prep school for boys intending to join our Order, in the Chicago Province.

.

 

1932 - 1933

d'Ouville, Edmond L., B. S. -32- Instructor in Electrical and Physical Chemistry B. S. in Ch. E., Villanova College, 1932

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Kunzenbacher, August A., A. M. -23- Associate Professor of Chemistry A. M., Villanova College, 1932

Panepinto, Francis W., M. S. -32- Professor of Chemistry B. Ch. E., Villanova College, 1925; M. S., 1927

 

1933 - 1934

d'Ouville, Edmond L., B. S. -32- Instructor in Electrical and' Physical Chemistry

Duncomb, Eli, M. S. -26- Professor of Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Chairman of the Department

Kunzenbacher, August A., A.M. -23- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Panepinto, Francis W., M. S. -32- Professor of Chemistry

 

1934 - 1935

d'Ouville, Edmond L., M. S. -32- Instructor in Electrical and Physical Chemistry M. S., University of Pennsylvania, 1934

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering- Chairman of the Department

Junzenbacher, August A., A. M. -23- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Panepinto, Francis W., M. S. -32- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

1935 - 1936

d'Ouville, Edmond L., M. S. -32- Instructor in Electrical and Physical Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M. A. -35-: Professor of Mathematics and Physics (sic) A. B., Villanova College, 1917, M. A., 1919. He taught organic chemistry to the Biology Majors (mostly pre-medical students) for the next eleven years, i.e., unti1 his death.

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, M.S. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering A. B., Villanova College, 1927, M. S., Catholic University of America, 1933

Kunzenbacher, August A., A. M. -23- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Panepinto, Francis W., M. S. -32- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

            Mr. Panepinto left us in 1936 to devote all his time to his research at the University of Pennsylvania. He received the degree of Ph. D. in Chemistry there in 1937 and accepted a position with a leather company in Philadelphia.

 

John Francis Hammond, OSA

            Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on June 12, 1895, John Hammond was a student at Villanova for about ten years before he graduated from the college with the degree of A. B. in 1917. Due to the early death of his parents, he was sent to the Tolentine Academy about 1907 and was here continuously as an Academy, Prep and College boy until his graduation. He was received into the Novitiate in 1913, was professed in 1914, and was ordained in 1920. From then until 1935 he was stationed at St. Rita's High School, in Chicago where he taught Chemistry (and short-hand!) and studied at the University of Chicago. At Chicago he completed all the courses for a Ph. D. in Chemistry and also a research project under M. S. Karasch, the discoverer of the Peroxide Effect. It was while he was studying at the University of Chicago that he came to know Edward L. Haenisch, whom he later persuaded to join our staff. Father Hammond came to Villanova as Professor of Chemistry in the fall of 1935. He taught Organic Chemistry to the Pre-meds for eleven years, until his sudden death from a heart attack on September 4, 1946. Before coming to Villanova full-time he taught here in several summer schools.

 

Edward Felix Jenkins, OSA

            Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on August 17, 1906, Edward Jenkins was educated at the Wilkes-Barre Academy (the old Harry Hillman Academy) and the Coughlin High School of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. At Villanova College he studied Pre-Med for two years and Arts for two years, getting the AB degree in 1927. He was received into the Augustinian Novitiate in 1927, professed in 1928 and ordained in 1931. In the fall of 1931 he was sent to the Catholic University of America, in Washington, to take anything he wanted, provided he could get a master's degree in one year. He took Chemistry, because he had always liked it, and because he felt that no matter what he took he would probably wind up teaching Chemistry, so he might as well know something about it. It took a year and a summer school to complete the work for the master's degree, which was received the following June. During the summer of 1932 the Prior Provincial told him he could continue for the doctorate. By the summer of 1935 the work was finished, except for the dissertation and final oral examination. A problem was assigned and permission granted to do the research at Villanova, under the direction of Dr. Henry P. Ward, Professor of Organic Chemistry at C.U. It was completed in 1938, the Oral Examination was passed in January, 1939 (on the stage of an auditorium, with an audience), and the degree was received in June of that year. After 35 years at Villanova, 26 in the Chemistry Department and 9 in the Astronomy Department, he is still working for his Alma Mater.

 

Edward Lauth Haenisch

            Born at Chicago, Illinois, August 11, 1911, Edward Haenisch received the degree of B. S. in 1930 and Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1935 from the University of Chicago, where he was also an Instructor in Chemistry from 1932 to 1934. From 1934 to 1936 he was an Instructor in Chemistry at Montana State College. He came to Villanova in 1936, where he was Assistant Professor from 1936 to 1938, Associate Professor 1938 to 1943, and Professor and Head of the Department from 1943 to 1949. He then went to Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana, as Professor of Chemistry and Department Head, a position he still holds (1970). He is a member of the American Chemical Society, the Franklin Institute, the AAAS, the American Institute of Chemists, the Electrochemical Society, and a Fellow and past president of the Indiana Academy of Sciences. (Am. Men of Science, 11th ed., 1967) He was the Director of the Institutes Section of the National Science Foundation, in Washington, D. C. from 1958 to 1959; the recipient of the American Chemical Society's Chemical Education Award in 1963, and of the 1967 James F. Norris Award. This award is given annually by the Northeast Section of the American Chemical Society in recognition of outstanding achievement in the teaching of Chemistry. An article in the Journal of Chemical Education, after reviewing his distinguished career, concludes with these words: In addition to these and numerous other examples of his concern for the education of chemists. Professor Haenisch is one of the finest classroom teachers active today. J. Chem. Ed. 44. 723 (1967).

 

1936 - 1937

d'Ouville, Edmond L., M. S. -32- Instructor in Electrical and Physical Chemistry

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. –36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

B. S., University of Chicago, 1930; Ph. D. 1935

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA J -35- Professor of Mathematics and Physics (sic) See 1935-1936

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, M. S. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W.,  OSA, M. A. -36- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering A. B., Villanova College, 1920 M. A.; Catholic University of America: 1924

 

            In the fall of 1936 the Villanova Chemical Engineering students formed a club which was promptly made a student affiliate of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. The members were both chemists and chemical engineers. Joseph J. Duffy, a senior chemical engineer, was elected the first president. Dr. Haenisch was the moderator.

            Edmond d'Ouville received the degree of Ph. D. in Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania in June, 1937 and left us to accept a position with the Standard Oil Company of Indiana, in Chicago, Illinois. He had been a part-time member of our staff for five years.

            Dr. Haenisch came to us after two years at Montana State College (now Montana State University), at Bozeman, Montana. The Villanova Engineer published a biographical sketch of Dr. Haenisch, with his picture, in the issue of October, 1936, page 5.

 

1937 - 1938

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chairman of the Department

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Haltenberger, William Jr., M. S. -37 - Instructor in Chemical Engineering, Université de Lausanne, Switzerland, 1927-28 B. S. in Ch. E., University of Michigan 1933, M. S., 1937

Hammond, Rev. John F., O. S. À., M. A. -35- Professor of Mathematics and Physics (sic) See 1935-1936

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, M. S. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. A., -36- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

            William Haltenberger, Jr., born 1910, a native of Budapest, Hungary, was our first full-time teacher of Chemical Engineering. He was also, I believe, the author of the first research paper to be published in one of the major American chemical journals from Villanova College: Enthalpy Concentration Charts from Vapor Pressure Data, Ind. Eng. Chem., 31 783-6 (1939). Modest and talented, he was a very agreeable young man, a hard worker and a good teacher. I remember he was very fond of skiing. After two years at Villanova he left us in June, 1939 to resume his doctoral studies at the University of Michigan. He died a year or two later, by suicide. The Villanova Engineer published a biographical article on Haltenberger in the issue of October, 1937. His picture is on the title page, and his biography on page 7.

 

1938 - 1939

Barr, Eugene A., M. S. -38- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering B. S. in Ch. E., Villanova College, 1937 M. S. in Ch. E., University of Pennsylvania) 1938

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Haltenberger, William, Jr., M. S. -37- Instructor in Chemical Engineering

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M. A. -35- Professor of Mathematics and Physics (sic) See 1935-1936

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, M. S. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. A. -36- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

 

1939 - 1940

Barr, Eugene A., M. S. -38- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M. A. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering.

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., O. S.A., Ph. D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ph. D., Catholic University of America, 1939

Limacher, Francis J., M. S. -39- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering B. S., Oregon State University, 1933, M. S., University of Michigan, 1937. His degrees were in Chemical Engineering; he replaced Mr. Haltenberger.

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. A. -36- Instructor m Chemistry and Chemical Engineering On leave of absence.

 

            Father Fitzgerald's health had been failing and early in November, 1939, he suffered a slight stroke. On Saturday, November 11, he asked me to come to his room, where he gave me his roll and book and told me to go on with his course. I started teaching Organic Chemistry to the Chemistry Majors and Chemical Engineers on Monday, November13, 1939, with a lecture on Polynuclear Hydrocarbons, based on Chapter 7 of Desha's Organic Chemistry, first edition. I taught the course for 22 years. This year Father Paquette was given Leave of Absence to study chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was awarded the Master's degree there on December 19, 1941, and was received into the Sigma Xi. While at MIT he studied inorganic chemistry. He was invited to continue for the Doctorate but did not do so. He taught Chemistry and mathematics for many years at Villanova. In 1964 he retired on account of ill health. He died Monday April 29, 1968, three months short of his 73rd birthday and the 45th anniversary of his ordination. He was buried in the St. Mary's Hall Cemetery, at Villanova.

 

1940 - 1941

Fitzgerald, Rev. Robert J., OSA, Ph. D. -19- Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M. A. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F.,  OSA, Ph. D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Limacher, Francis J., M. S. -39- Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering B. S., Oregon State University, 1933 M. S., University of Michigan, 1937

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36-, Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering M. S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1940

Quagliano, James V., M. S. -40- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering B. S. 1930; M. S., 1940; Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute

 

            Mr. Limacher left us in June, 1941, to enter defense industry. A biographical sketch of him, with his picture, was published by the Villanova Engineer in the issue of October, 1939, page 13.

 

            James McKenna, our storeroom keeper since 1933, left us in June, 1941 to join the Army. He was in the Army Air Force, and a member of a unit that kept the planes in good condition. He told me their motto was: We keep them flying. He came through the war without injury. He was succeeded in the storeroom by Mrs. Margaret Boyle, of Norristown, a widow with several children who had been working at Villanova as a seamstress since 1932. She was in charge of the storeroom for 24 years, until she died after a short illness, on January 6, 1965.

 

1941 - 1942

Blumenfeld, Harry - 41 - Instructor in Chemical Engineering B. S., Ch. E., 1940. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, M.S., Ch. E., 1941, University of Florida

Mr. Limacher was replaced in 1941 by Mr. Blumenfeld who also studied on a part-time basis for his Ph. D. in Ch. E. at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Delaware while teaching at Villanova.

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chairman of the Department

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M.A., -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA., Ph. D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., M. S. -36- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Quagliano, James V., M. S. -40- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Vener, Raymond - 41- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering B. S., Ch. E., Villanova College,1941

 

            The important news for this year was the accreditation of our Chemistry Department by the American Chemical Society. The first list of colleges and universities accredited by the American Chemical Society, who might be called the Charter Members, was published in the October 10, 1940 issue of the "News Edition” of The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, later renamed Chemical and Engineering News. In 1941, the first year in which any additions were made to the list, we were added to it. Our accreditation was announced in the October 25, 1941 issue of the same “News Edition”. Since then we have always continued to retain our accreditation. Dr. Haenisch was very instrumental in getting it for us.

 

1942 - 1943 One Hundredth Year

Fitzgerald. Rev. Robert J., OSA I Ph. D. -19- Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Hammond. Rev. John F. OSA, M. A. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M.S. -36- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Quagliano, James V., M. S. -40- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

            Father Fitzgerald died at Villanova on June 18, 1943 at the age of 75. On February 6, 1943 the Villanova Chemistry Club was formally made a student affiliate of the American Chemical Society. The members were both Chemists and Chemical Engineers.

            Mr. Blumenfeld left us, suddenly, in June 1943 to accept a position as Development Engineer with the Sun Oil Company at Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania. He was with them two years. His departure caught us without a chemical engineer. I justified my title for the first time by teaching a Chemical Engineering course called "Unit Processes in Organic Chemistry", during the summer term of 1943, which ran from the beginning of July to the end of October. Then, I believe, Dr. Haenisch taught a Chemical Engineering course during the winter term, which ran from the end of October to the end of February, 1944. Mr. Blanchard came to us in 1944, in time, I think, for the spring term, which began in March.

 

1943 - 1944

Catalog missing, if there ever was one

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M. S. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F.,  OSA, Ph. D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Quag1iano, James V., M. S. -40- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

            Mr. Quagliano was a very industrious young man and a popular teacher. While at Villanova he attempted to obtain his doctorate by studying on a part-time basis at the University of Pennsylvania. Deciding that this was taking too long, he left us in 1944 to get a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry with J. C. Bailar at the University of Illinois. After receiving his doctorate there in 1946 he accepted a position with the University of Maryland which he held for two years, when he joined the staff of the University of Notre Dame. He is currently with Florida State University.

 

1944 - 1945

Blanchard, Francis J. -44- Instructor in Chemical Engineering, B. S. in Ch. E., 1943, Louisiana State University

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Hammond, Rev. John F., OSA, M. A. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F.,  OSA, Ph. D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

 

1945 - 1946

Blanchard, Francis J., B. S. in Ch. E. -44- Instructor, Chemical Engineering

Haenisch, Edward L. Ph. D. -36- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering – Chairman of the Department

Hammond, Rev. John F, OSA, M. A. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

Fr. Paquette left the Chemistry Department after the Winter Term of 1945-46 and did not return until September 1954. He spent the intervening years as an instructor in mathematics at Villanova.

Quam, George Norman, Ph. D. -46- Associate Professor of Chemistry A. B., University of South Dakota, 1916 M. S., University of Wisconsin, 1922 Ph. D., Iowa State University, 1924

He came to us from the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and began teaching at the beginning of the Spring Term, March 5, 1946.

 

George Norman Quam

            Born at Madison, Wisconsin, May 7, 1891, George Quam as a boy moved with his family from Wisconsin to Tennessee to Wisconsin to South Dakota. In Fremont, South Dakota, he received his high school education and during summer vacations worked as a cowboy, the only genuine cowboy I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. He says he couldn't sing or play the guitar but neither could any of the other cowboys. He received the Degree of A. B. from the University of South Dakota in 1916, M. S., University of Wisconsin, 1921 and Ph. D., Iowa State, 1924. Between the AB and the MS came the First World War, in which he was first a mule driver in a machine gun battalion, and second, in Chemical Warfare. He was an Assistant at Iowa State, 1921-23; Professor at Midland College, 1923-24; Assistant Professor at Coe College, 1925-28 and Professor 1928-29; and Associate Professor at Long Island University and at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1929-46. At Villanova he was Professor 1946-49 and Professor and Department Head from 1949 to 1960. Since then he has been carrying on a strongly supported program of Laboratory Safety in the Villanova University Department of Research and Development. He is a member of the Am. Chem. Soc., the Pa. Acad. of Sci., the A. A. A. S., the N. S. C., the P. C. R. T. S. and the P. A. C. C. T.

 

            Father Hammond, apparently in good health, taught Organic Chemistry as usual to the Biology Majors in the Winter, Spring and Summer terms of the year 1945-1946. It was expected that he would teach it in the Fall term of 1946 but he died suddenly of a stroke on September 4, 1946, aged 51. His class was combined with the Chemical Engineers and Chemistry Majors and was taught by me.

 

1946 - 1947

NOTES

            Mr. Charles A. Dahlke came to us in September, 1946, and was with us continuously as a part-time teacher of chemistry until his death, of a stroke, twenty years later. He was a full-time engineer on the staff of Foote Mineral Company.

            The Messrs. Mento, Scanlon and Wendel all came to us in the fall of 1946 on getting out of the Navy. Mr. Wendel remained with us for one year, Mr. Scanlon for two, and Mr. Mento for eight.

            The March 11, 1947 issue of The Villanovan announces that the college has acquired, through the War Assets Board, the entire Analytical Laboratory of the then idle ALCOA plant at Burlington, New Jersey. The equipment, consisting of a Spectrograph, a pH meter, calorimeters, fume hoods, darkroom equipment, laboratory furniture, etc. was valued at about $100,000, and was acquired by us for about $5000. We were lucky to get it, as other schools were after it. Some of the equipment went into the new chemical engineering building, then under construction. The rest was used to modernize and improve the Chemical Laboratories.

            The equipment was delivered during the next few weeks and was installed during the summer. At this time we also took over the rest of the front section of the Mendel Hall fourth floor, i.e., all the space east of the chemistry laboratories, with the exception of the space in the wing. The space acquired consisted of six large bedrooms, one with a private bath. It was transformed into an Instrumental Analysis Laboratory and Dark Room, a Physical Chemistry Laboratory, and a Freshman Balance Room. At this time also, we gave our old storeroom space to the Physics department, to use as an office. Father John J. Vrana, O.S.A., then Professor of Engineering Drawing, now (1968) Pastor of the Church of the Resurrection, Dania, Florida, was very instrumental in getting this for us.

 

1947 - 1948

No catalog available

Blanchard, Francis J., B. S. in Ch. E., -44- Instructor in Chemical Engineering

Dahlke, Charles A., B. S. in Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Gero, Alexander, Ph. D. -47- Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Ph. D., University of Vienna, Austria, 1930

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., O.S.A., Ph.D. -35- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E., Villanova, 1944 - -46- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Plunkett, Rev. Richard M., OSA, M. S. -46- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Scanlon, George T., B. Ch. E. Villanova, 1945 -46- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Strong, Frederick C. III, M. S. -47- Assistant Professor of Chemistry A. B., Swarthmore, 1939 M. S., Lehigh University, 1941 Graduate study at Bryn Mawr, where he obtained his doctorate in 1954 by working there part-time. Mr. Strong came to us after two years at Cedar Crest College, Allentown, Pennsylvania.

 

1948 - 1949

Dated September 1948

Blanchard, Francis J., B. S. Ch. E. -44- Instructor in Chemical Engineering

Dahlke, Charles A., B. S. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

Dauwalter, Kurt A., B. A. -48- Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A., LaSalle College, 1943 Ph.D., The Catholic University of America, 1950. Mr. Dauwalter came in the summer of 1948 and stayed one year. After leaving us he went to LaSalle College for 2 years and then was at Seton Hall until his death in. 1959.

Frere, Francis J., B. S. -48- Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.S., Ph. D. He taught Instrumental Analysis for a few months.

Gero, Alexander, Ph. D. -47- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Haenisch, Edward L., Ph. D. -36- Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering - Chairman of the Department

Hall, John H., A.M. -48- Instructor, in Chemical Engineering A. B., Harvard Col1ege, 1903; A. M. 1904

Henry, James L., B. S. -48- Instructor in Chemistry B. S., Villanova, 1944

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph.D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Strong, Frederick C. III, M. S. –47- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

            Dr. Haenisch left us in June 1949, to become Head of the Chemistry Department in Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana. Before going he hired two men to replace him: Dr. Robert P. Koob and Dr. Paul E. Machemer. He is still at Wabash (1970).

 

1949 - 1950  Catalog LXXXI

            This year marks the beginning of separate departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Dr. Robert E. White was appointed first chairman of the Chemical Engineering Department. Dr. George N. Quam succeeded Dr. Haenisch as chairman of the Chemistry Department. I will continue with the history of the Chemistry Department.

 

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Gero, Alexander, Ph. D. 47- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Henry, James L., B. S. -48- Instructor in Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Koob, Robert P., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry B. S. in Chemistry, Villanova 1943, M. S. University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph. D. 1949. Hired by Dr. Haenisch to replace him in Physical Chemistry

Machemer, Paul E., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry A. B. Princeton, 1940 M. S. University of Pennsylvania, 1943; Ph. D. 1949 Hired by Dr. Haenisch to replace him in Analytical Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry Chairman of the Department

Slater, Louis M., B. S. -49- Assistant in Chemistry B. S. in Chemistry, Villanova, 1949

Strong, Frederick C. III, M. S. -46- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

 

            James Shea, of King of Prussia, came to us as a part-time machinist and carpenter in the fall of 1949, for the Chemistry department. He became full-time for the Chemistry and Astronomy departments on November 1, 1961. He is still with us, September 8, 1970.

 

1950 - 1951 No catalog

Busch, Rev. Jan, H., OSA, A. B. -50- Instructor in Chemistry A. B. University of Leiden, Netherlands, 1949

Gero, Alexander, Ph. D. -47- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Henry, James L., B. S. -48- Instructor in Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Koob, Robert P., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Machemer, Paul E., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

 

            Mr. Strong left us in June, 1951, to accept a position on the faculty of the Stevens Institute of Technology. He obtained his Ph. D. in Chemistry from Bryn Mawr in 1954. After teaching a while at the Interamerican University in Puerto Rico, he joined the staff of the University of Bridgeport, Connecticut, where he is currently head of the Chemistry Department. (1968)

 

1951 - 1952 No catalog

Busch, Rev. Jan H., OSA, A. B. -50- Instructor in Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Gardner, David M., B. S. -51- Instructor in Chemistry

Gero, Alexander. Ph. D. -47- Assistant Professor of Chemistry He left us in June, 1952 to accept a position as Professor of Physiological Chemistry at the Hahnemann Medical College

Henry, James L., B. S.-48- Instructor in Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Koch, Theodore A., M. S. -51- Instructor in Chemistry

Koob, Robert P., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Machemer, Paul E., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry Chairman of the Department

 

1952 - 1953

Brumbaugh, Robert J., Ph. D. -52- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B. S. Juniata College, 1942 M. S. University of Pennsylvania, 1948; Ph. D. 1950

Busch, Rev. Jan H.,  OSA, B. S. -50- Instructor in Chemistry B. S., Villanova College, 1952

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Feighan, Joseph A., M. S. -52- Instructor in Chemistry, Rittenhouse Area College, Philadelphia 1947-48, B.S. in Chemistry, St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia, 1951 M. S. in Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 1952

Florentine, Robert A., M. S. -52- Instructor in Chemistry, B. S. in Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 1949; M. S., 1951

Forsgard, Frederick G., M. S. -52- Instructor in Chemistry. A. B. University of Pennsylvania 1949; M. S. 1950

Henry, James L., B. S. -48- Instructor in Chemistry

Hobson, Melvin C., M. S. -52- Instructor in Chemistry. B. S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 1948 M. S. University of Pennsylvania 1951

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., Ph. D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Koob, Robert P., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Machemer, Paul E., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E. -47- Instructor in Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

 

 

1953 - 1954

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry B. S., St. Bonaventure College, 1951 M. S., Fordham University, 1953

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Henry, James L., B. S. -47- Instructor in Chemistry Left us in June, 1954, for the Foote Mineral Company

Hobson, Melvin C., M. M. -52- Instructor in Chemistry. Left in 1953 June, 1954.

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F. OSA, Ph. D. -35- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Koob, Robert P., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Machemer, Paul E., Ph. D. -49- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Mento, Peter F., B. Ch. E. -47- Instructor in Chemistry; Left us in June, 1954

Quam, George N., Ph. D.,-46- Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Spadafora, Sherwood H., B. S. 53- Instructor in Chemistry B. S., Villanova College, 1953

Stinson, Edgar J., Ph. D. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry B. S., Purdue University, 1948 M. S., Iowa State University, 1951, Ph. D. 1953

 

1954 - 1955

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Henry, James L., B. S. -48- Instructor in Chemistry.

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35:- Professor of Chemistry

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Instructor in Chemistry

Koob, Robert P., Ph. D. -49- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Left us in June, 1955, for St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia

Machemer, Paul E., Ph. D. -49- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Returned from Mathematics Department to Chemistry Department in September, 1954

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry. Chairman of the Department

Spadafora, Sherwood H., B. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry

Stinson, Edgar J., Ph. D. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry * In Catalog but not here. See 1953-1954.

 

1955 - 1956

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry,

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Heininger, Clarence G. Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.S. Villanova College, 1950, Ph. D. University of Rochester, 1954 Research Associate, Princeton, 1954-55, replaced Dr. Koob

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Professor of Chemistry

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Instructor in Chemistry

Machemer, Paul E. Ph. D. -49- Associate Professor of Chemistry. Left us in June 1956 for Colby College, Waterville, Maine

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M.S. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D., -46- Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Schwartz, Donald, Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B. S., University of Missouri, 1949, M. S., Montana State University, 1950, Ph. D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1955

Spadafora, Sherwood H., B. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry

Stinson, Edgar J., Ph. D. -53-, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Left us in June 1956 for the United States Department of Agriculture -Research and Development Laboratory, Philadelphia, Pa.

 

1956 - 1957

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Hartmann, Max, Ph. D. -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Ph. D., University of Dresden, Germany, 1924

Heininger, Clarence G., Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -, 35- Professor of Chemistry

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Markham, James J., B. S. -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B. S. in Chemistry, Villanova College, 1950, Temple University, 1950-51, Texas A & M, 1951-52 (Oceanography), PhD University of Minnesota, 1952-56

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry Chairman of the Department

Schwartz, Donald, Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Spadafora, Sherwood H., B. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry

 

            During the summer of 1957 we took over eight of the eighteen rooms in the fourth floor dormitory wing of old Mendel Hall, the wing called "Garrett Hill". We took four rooms on the north side for a Physical Chemistry Laboratory Annex (?), and four rooms on the other side for offices. A year later we took over the rest of the rooms for offices, a workroom, two storage rooms, and a freshman Balance Room. The only room we did not take over was George McCook's, room, which he continued to live in until 1960, to watch the Observatory.

 

 

1957 - 1958

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Doyne, Thomas H., Ph. D. -57- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B. S., Pennsylvania State College, 1950; M. S., 1953, University of Osaka, Japan, 1953-54, Ph. D., Pennsylvania State University, 1957

Hartmann, Max, Ph. D. -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Heininger, Clarence G., Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. He left in August, 1958 for St. John Fisher College, Rochester, New York

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Profess9r of Chemistry

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Assistant. Professor of Chemistry

Markham, James J., Ph.D. [was B.S.] -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Assistant Professor of Chemistry,

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Schwartz, Donald, Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Spadafora, Sherwood, H., M. S. -53- Instructor in Chemistry, M. S., St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia, 1957

Spalding, Richard E., Ph. D. -57- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Sc. B., Brown University, 1949, Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1954

 

1958 - 1959

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry,

Dah1ke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Doyne, Thomas H., Ph. D. -57 - Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Hartmann, Max, Ph. D., -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. He left in June, 1959

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Professor of Chemistry

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53-Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Markham, James J., Ph. D. -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Ph. D., University of Minnesota, 1958

O'Driscoll, Kenneth F., Ph. D. -58- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.Ch.E., Pratt Institute, 1952, M. A., Princeton University, 1957; Ph. D., 1958

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph.D. -46- Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Schwartz, Donald, Ph. D. -55- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Spadafora, Sherwood H., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Spalding, Richard, Ph. D. -57- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Dr. Spalding left us in June, 1959 to accept a Research Fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

1959 - 1960

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Downey, Bernard J., Ph. D. -59- Associate Professor of Chemistry. A. B., 1938; M. S., 1945; Ph.D., 1952, The Catholic University of America

Doyne, Thomas H., Ph. D. -57- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D.-35- Professor of Chemistry and Astronomy

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Markham, James J.; Ph. D. -56-, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

O'Driscoll, Kenneth F., Ph. D. -58- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., O.S.A., M.S. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Spadafora, Sherwood H., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

 

1960 - 1961

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch.E. -46- Instructor of Chemistry

Downey, Bernard J., Ph. D. -59- Associate Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Doyne, Thomas H., Ph. D. -57- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., OSA, Ph. D. -35- Professor of Chemistry and Astronomy

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Markham, James J., Ph. D. -56- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

O'Driscoll, Kenneth F., Ph. D. -58- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Paquette, Rev. Joseph W., OSA, M. S. -36- Associate Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Roberti, Dominic M., Ph. D. -60- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B. S., St. Joseph's College, 1955, M.A. 1958; Ph. D., 1959, Princeton University

Spadafora, Sherwood H., M.S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Zajac, Walter A., Jr., Ph. D. -59- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

            * On September I, 1960 Dr. Quam became Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, and Dr. Bernard J. Downey succeeded him as Chairman of the Department

 

1961 - 1962

Barnhurst, William J., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Cawley, John J., Ph. D. -61- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B. S., 1955, Boston College

M. S., 1957, Ph. D., 1961, Harvard University

Dahlke, Charles A., B. Ch. E. -46- Instructor in Chemistry

Downey, Bernard J., Ph. D. -59- Associate Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department

Doyne, Thomas H., Ph. D. -57- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Jenkins, Rev. Edward F., O.S.A., Ph.D. -35- Listed in the catalog as Professor of Chemistry and Astronomy but had no chemistry classes after summer school of 1961

Kavanagh, Charles J., A. B. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Lichtenstein, Ivan E., Ph. D. -61- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A. B., 1955, Columbia University, Ph. D., 1960, University of California

Markham, James J., Ph. D. -56- Associate Professor of Chemistry

O'Driscol1, Kenneth F., Ph. D. -58- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Quam, George N., Ph. D. -46- Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Roberti, Dominic M., Ph. D. -60- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Ronwin, Edward, Ph. D. -61- Associate Professor of Chemistry. B. S., 1949, City College of New York, M. S. 1950. University of Illinois, Ph. D., 1952, University of California

Spadafora, Sherwood H., M. S. -53- Assistant Professor of Chemistry

de la Vega, Jose R., Ph. D. -61- Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Doctor en Ciencias 1948, University of Havana, Cuba

Zajac, Walter A., Jr., Ph. D. -59- Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

 

            In the spring of 1961 the Chemistry Department vacated their quarters in Old Mendel Hall and moved to Mendel Hall - the new Science Building.

 


 

Sources of Information about Villanova College

 

1. Historical Sketch of the Augustinian Monastery. College and Mission of St. Thomas of Villanova, Delaware County. Pa., during the first half century of their existence 1342-1892, compiled by the Rev. Thomas C. Middleton, D.D., OSA

 

2. Old Saint Augustine's in Philadelphia, with some records of the work of the Austin Friars in the United States, prepared by one of the Friars at Villanova, Pa., Fr. Francis Edward Tourscher, S. T. M., Peter Reilly Company, Philadelphia, 1937.

 

3. The Falvey Library, Villanova, collection of College Catalogs, 1871 to date.

 

4. The Falvey Library, Villanova, collection of Commencement Programs.

 

5. The Magazine of Our Lady of Good Counsel (mostly pious articles, stories and poems, but also interesting news articles). 1886 to 1910 and 1924 to 1930. Complete in Falvey Library.

 

6. The Villanova Monthly, published by the Villanova College students from September, 1893 to June, 1898, i.e., for five scholastic years. It probably was discontinued in 1898. Complete in Falvey Library.

 

7. The Villanovan, continuous since Volume 1, Number 1 (November 1916) except for a gap of 2 or 3 years after 1925 when it was not published. First quarterly, then bi-monthly, then monthly and now weekly. Not always reliable, especially during the late 1960's, but very useful. Incomplete for 1923 to 1928, in Falvey Library.

 

8. The Villanova Alumnus, in Falvey Library, complete First Series, volumes 1 to 4; April 1933 to January 1936 Second Series, volume 1, May 1938, to date

 

9. The Villanova Engineer called The Owl to Vol. 8, No.6, for March 1933 Vol. 1, No.1, October 1925 to date. The Falvey Library holdings are incomplete before 1945, complete since Vol. 20, No.1, February 1949. Not published 1944 to 1949.

 

10. The Falvey Library collection of Villanova College and University Year Books. The Belle Air, published annually since 1922, except 1923 - complete.

 

11. The Mendel Bulletin, published by the Biology Department since Vol. 1, May 1929. 1929-1943: published quarterly; 1943-1951: not published; 1951 to date: published annually except for 1952. Falvey Library holdings practically complete.

 

12. The Villanova Law Review Published by the Villanova Law School, 1956 to date, quarterly.

 

13. American Men of Science 1st ed. 1906, 11th ed. 1968 Gives data on many of our professors.

 

14. The Engineering School - a Retrospection Musings of an Old Grad - Laboratories and Classrooms by Prof. John F. Sweeney, CE, 1912 The Owl, Vol. II, Nos. 5 & 7, (1927), Falvey Library

 

 


The Villanova College Chemical Laboratories

 

            Before 1901 the main building of Villanova College was the one now called Alumni Hall. The east wing of this building was built in 1848, the rest in 1871, and it contained a room called “The Laboratory". There are several pictures of this laboratory in the old Villanova Quarterlies and Catalogues. It looked like a combination Chemistry-Physics laboratory, with a static electric machine, a vacuum pump, reagents on a shelf and a sink. I suppose it was a typical nineteenth century laboratory for carrying out demonstrations and experiments in what was then called Natural Philosophy. The old catalogs all mention "chemical laboratory work and demonstrations". The large college building which burned down on January 29, 1928 was started in the spring of 1899 and finished two years later. On March 27, 1899 Mass was said for the deceased brethren, twenty in number, who were buried in the Community Cemetery, then north-west of the Church, after which their remains were disinterred and reburied in the present cemetery. Ground was then broken for the new Monastery and College. The Monastery and College were finished in 1901. There was at first a great deal of extra space in the new college building. As time went on and new courses were instituted this was gradually filled up, and it became necessary to move laboratories from one place to another, to make the best use of available space, a process which still goes on.

            The first Chemistry Laboratory was in a small room just east of the central stairs, on the north side of the new college building. The class was probably no more than 15 or 20, if that, and comprised AB and BS candidates. The BS degree was first offered in 1902, for boys who wanted to substitute natural sciences for Latin and Greek. This new laboratory was a combination laboratory-classroom. In 1905 the first Civil and Electrical Engineering students were enrolled, and soon made more chemical laboratory space necessary. At some unknown time, probably about 1907 or 1908, the Chemical Laboratory made its first move, to a room at the SE corner of the basement, right under the President's Office. (The President's Office was for about 50 years where the Engineering Office is now). This basement chemistry laboratory was later transformed into the Materials Testing Laboratory, and is now the Highway Laboratory. Here Chemistry remained for nine or ten years.

            The next big shift came about as a result of the First World War, and possibly, as Mr. Sweeney intimates, due to decreased confidence of the President in the embryo chemists. (To the reminiscences of Mr. John Sweeney, C. E., Villanova, 1912, and Assistant and Associate Professor of Civil Engineering from 1913 to 1930, we owe much of this information of the old days (The Owl, Vol. 2, No.6 et seq.) In the fa1l of 1917 the chemistry laboratories were moved up to the first floor again. This was made necessary by the large group of boys, called the Students' Army Training Corps (SATC) sent here by the War Department for training as Officer Candidates.

            The history of Chemistry at Villanova from 1916 on, owes much to the unusual talents and tireless energy of the Reverend Ruellan P. Fink, OSA, now Prior of our monastery at Holland, Michigan. Born November 30, 1891 at Littlestown, Pennsylvania, Ruellan Fink began his studies as a postulant at Villanova in 1905, in the original Belle Air mansion. In January of his final year of study before the Novitiate this building was destroyed by fire, and the boys were moved into one of two large dormitories, called the Coops, on the top floor of the new college building, which I will henceforth call College Hall, the name by which it was known before the fire. The following short sketch of his early career at Villanova is based on a letter he wrote me on May 7, 1968, on a booklet published at the time of his Golden Anniversary on June 8, 1969, and on a recent conversation with him, in July 1970: On June 20, 1912 he was received into the Novitiate and also began, under the rules prevalent at that time, his first year of college work. During this year he was selected to study chemistry, and began his chemical training under the direction of Mr. John Mockaitis, working in the basement laboratory at Villanova. During the summer of 1913 he took courses at the Harrison Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania. During the following year he took more courses with Mr. Mockaitis and during the summer of 1914 more courses at the University of Pennsylvania. During the year 1914-1915, his Junior year, he went to Penn several days a week, and again to summer school in 1915. During his Senior year it was arranged that he should take all his classes at Villanova privately, except for a class in Ethics. As a consequence he made two round trips to Penn every day, returning to Villanova for the ethics class. We were quite poor at that time and the President, Father Edward Dohan, OSA, could only afford to give him fifty cents a week for lunch. Father Fink says he made out all right, though, getting a hot dog and a bottle of pop for five cents each at a little stand near the laboratory every day. (I forgot to ask him what he did on Fridays). To make up for the light lunch the President arranged for him to get a good dinner every evening on his return from town. The Master of the Professed also arranged for him to mop a corridor or a chateau every evening, after dinner, to keep him from getting a swelled head. Young John O'Leary took many of these courses too, but he didn’t like chemistry and got out of it as soon as he could. In the Fall of 1916 Mr. Fink began his first year of Theology, and also his first year as the Head of Villanova's Chemistry Department, with Mr. O'Leary as his assistant. The reason for this was that Mr. Mockaitis wanted $1800, and we could not afford to give it to him. (I believe he wanted to get married). Mr. Fink and Mr. O'Leary consequently taught chemistry and related subjects at Villanova while they studied theology. Mr. Mockaitis left in June 1916 for the Esso Refinery at Bayonne, New Jersey, where he worked as a research chemist until his death in 1959. On June 8, 1919, Fathers Fink and O’Leary, with nine other classmates, were ordained at St. Charles Borromeo's Seminary by Archbishop Dougherty. During the following year, as student priests, they followed the same schedule as before.

            In the spring of 1917 the United States declared war on Germany and most of the able-bodied students were soon either drafted or enlisted in the armed forces. If it had not been for our SATC unit Villanova would have been emptied. The students were all enlisted men in the army, and were under army rules. Mr. Fink suddenly found himself with 160 chemistry students. The solution to this problem was to move the laboratory upstairs, to the first floor again, but to larger accommodations than formerly. The Chemistry Laboratory now was a large room on the north side of the building next to the East Stairs, which are still where they always were. This large room, with a little room with a cement floor next to it, took up all the space on that side down to the central staircase. Father Fink wrote to me in 1968: "Adjoining the chemistry laboratory on the First Floor was a little room with a cement floor in which I taught Assaying and Gas Analysis to the Engineers. I taught Geology, Mineralogy and Metallurgy in a classroom, with the help of two cases of minerals, opposite the Chemistry Laboratory. Father O'Leary taught Organic and Analytical Chemistry. In the Chemistry Laboratory were laboratory tables and 40 lockers where Father Fink taught 160 students in two sections. Apparently they worked in pairs, with two pairs per locker.

            In 1918 it was decided to offer courses leading to the degrees of BS in Chemistry and BS in Chemical Engineering, under the direction of the Rev. Robert Fitzgerald, OSA, Ph. D., who had recently come to us from Ireland. Father Fitzgerald was a well-trained chemist, especially in the field of coal-tar dyes, which he had studied in German universities before the war. More laboratory space was required and the courses would probably not have been offered at all if Father Charles M. Driscoll, OSA, had not succeeded in persuading Mr. Maurice J. Curran of Andover, Massachusetts, to give us $5000 for chemical laboratory equipment. I have also been informed that about the same time the State of Pennsylvania passed a law requiring all school chemistry laboratories be put on the top floor, for fear of explosions. I have not been able to check this latter item. At all events, a large section of the dormitories on the top floor of College Hall was transformed into a chemical laboratory for Father Fitzgerald's boys. It may seem strange that a chemical laboratory should be placed between two dormitories, but I am not sure that such was not the case for several years. Father Fink of course, was not satisfied with all this. His boys needed a new laboratory as much as Father Fitzgerald's, so it was not long before The Villanovan announced further good news; Mr. Curran had given us $5000 more “with which a new organic chemical laboratory will be constructed on the top floor, next to the engineers' laboratory". I worked in this well-equipped organic laboratory very happily during the year 1924-1925, under the direction of Father Fink. Next to it, on the PRR side of the building, was the large General Chemistry laboratory where I started my chemical education in the fall of 1923. In the middle, between all these laboratories was the Store Room, presided over by August A. (Mike) Kunzenbacher.

 

The following paragraph has nothing to do with chemistry, but I am going to include it anyway.

 

On the east side of the small hall at the head of the central staircase, which before the fire went all the way up to the top floor, were two large biology laboratories, the General Biology Laboratory on the north or PRR side of the building, and the Bacteriology and Cat Anatomy Laboratory on the south or Pike side. In the early 1920's the General Biology Laboratory was under the direction of Mr. George Zebrowski, an excellent teacher, assisted by Mr., later Dr. John Ford. The Bacteriology and Cat Anatomy Laboratories were under the direction of Father Michael Hopkins, OSA, also an excellent teacher. I worked in both of these laboratories. I thought most of the teachers were good but some of the classes were miserable, because many of the "students” were not qualified to be in the classes. This was especially true of the French class. The other main faults of Villanova College at this time were in my opinion that, it had no swimming pool or library. It is hard to imagine that there was no library, but such was the case. Shortly after I came I asked one of my teachers where the library was. He gave me a queer look and said there were some books in the monastery but they didn't encourage the boys to go up there. At this time, however, Austin Hall was under construction, with a future library in the East Wing. When it was finally completed in the fall of 1924 the Monastery Library was moved into it, and the priests are said to have filled it up with their surplus books. It never amounted to much as a college library as the books were locked behind an iron grill, where the boys could not touch them. I suppose the Librarian, Father Tourscher, was given very little money to spend on books. By moving the Monastery Library into the new Austin Hall Library, though, he saved it from being destroyed in the Monastery fire of 1932. It probably did not appeal much to the college boys of the time, but it is a valuable collection of works on Philosophy, Theology and Church History.

 

To make it clear where all these places were in the old College Hall I enclose a set of plans, which I have reconstructed from memory and from what is left of the old building. The second and third floor plans have nothing to do with chemistry but I enclose them anyway. Fathers Fink and Hopkins checked these plans for me in 1968. Dr. Edward Burke of the Philadelphia Police. Laboratory also checked them for me. He was one of Father Fitzgerald's first graduates, and also was a student in the “Prep”, the Villanova Preparatory School, which was moved to Malvern between 1921 and 1925, a year at a time.

 

 

[Here Father stopped and made the transition to the Astronomy Department – which he founded.]